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Zen Jeweler: A Simple Matter of Context

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AS A STUNT, The Washington Post asked world-acclaimed violinist Joshua Bell to play his Stradiva-rius during rush-hour in a Metro subway station. Here’s what happened: 

He played for 45 minutes. Six people stopped to listen (out of nearly 1,100). He made $32 and change. The Post article talks about context and framing and how we have no more time for beauty. The article has led me to ask a question. 

When people enter your store, can they see and feel that you are a concert hall, acoustically perfect? Does everything (from the lighting to the length of time the concert goes on before you pause for intermission) work together to show off the musicians, the dancers, and the works of art you wish them to appreciate? 

Taken out of context, Joshua Bell is just another street musician. But get the context right and he is something extraordinary. Look with a critical eye at every single facet of your store. Get the frames and the context right, and your works of art will be pre-sold.

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Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

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Zen Jeweler: A Simple Matter of Context

mm

Published

on

AS A STUNT, The Washington Post asked world-acclaimed violinist Joshua Bell to play his Stradiva-rius during rush-hour in a Metro subway station. Here’s what happened: 

He played for 45 minutes. Six people stopped to listen (out of nearly 1,100). He made $32 and change. The Post article talks about context and framing and how we have no more time for beauty. The article has led me to ask a question. 

When people enter your store, can they see and feel that you are a concert hall, acoustically perfect? Does everything (from the lighting to the length of time the concert goes on before you pause for intermission) work together to show off the musicians, the dancers, and the works of art you wish them to appreciate? 

Taken out of context, Joshua Bell is just another street musician. But get the context right and he is something extraordinary. Look with a critical eye at every single facet of your store. Get the frames and the context right, and your works of art will be pre-sold.

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

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