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Zen Jeweler: A Simple Matter of Context

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AS A STUNT, The Washington Post asked world-acclaimed violinist Joshua Bell to play his Stradiva-rius during rush-hour in a Metro subway station. Here’s what happened: 

He played for 45 minutes. Six people stopped to listen (out of nearly 1,100). He made $32 and change. The Post article talks about context and framing and how we have no more time for beauty. The article has led me to ask a question. 

When people enter your store, can they see and feel that you are a concert hall, acoustically perfect? Does everything (from the lighting to the length of time the concert goes on before you pause for intermission) work together to show off the musicians, the dancers, and the works of art you wish them to appreciate? 

Taken out of context, Joshua Bell is just another street musician. But get the context right and he is something extraordinary. Look with a critical eye at every single facet of your store. Get the frames and the context right, and your works of art will be pre-sold.

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When Sales Beat Projections, You Know Wilkerson Did Its Job

There are no crystal balls when it comes to sales projections. But when Thomasville, Georgia jeweler Fran Lewis chose Wilkerson to run the retirement/going-out-of-business sale for Lewis Jewelers and More, she was pleasantly surprised to learn that even Wilkerson could one-up its own sales numbers. “Not only did we meet our goal, but we exceeded the goal that Wilkerson had given us by about 134%,” she says. After more than 40 years in the business, Lewis says she decided a few years ago to “move towards retirement.” And she was impressed by Wilkerson’s tenure in the industry. Overall, she’d recommend the company to anyone else who may be thinking it’s time to hang up their loupe. “As a full package, they’ve done a very good job and I’d definitely recommend Wilkerson.”

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Zen Jeweler: A Simple Matter of Context

mm

Published

on

AS A STUNT, The Washington Post asked world-acclaimed violinist Joshua Bell to play his Stradiva-rius during rush-hour in a Metro subway station. Here’s what happened: 

He played for 45 minutes. Six people stopped to listen (out of nearly 1,100). He made $32 and change. The Post article talks about context and framing and how we have no more time for beauty. The article has led me to ask a question. 

When people enter your store, can they see and feel that you are a concert hall, acoustically perfect? Does everything (from the lighting to the length of time the concert goes on before you pause for intermission) work together to show off the musicians, the dancers, and the works of art you wish them to appreciate? 

Taken out of context, Joshua Bell is just another street musician. But get the context right and he is something extraordinary. Look with a critical eye at every single facet of your store. Get the frames and the context right, and your works of art will be pre-sold.

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

When Sales Beat Projections, You Know Wilkerson Did Its Job

There are no crystal balls when it comes to sales projections. But when Thomasville, Georgia jeweler Fran Lewis chose Wilkerson to run the retirement/going-out-of-business sale for Lewis Jewelers and More, she was pleasantly surprised to learn that even Wilkerson could one-up its own sales numbers. “Not only did we meet our goal, but we exceeded the goal that Wilkerson had given us by about 134%,” she says. After more than 40 years in the business, Lewis says she decided a few years ago to “move towards retirement.” And she was impressed by Wilkerson’s tenure in the industry. Overall, she’d recommend the company to anyone else who may be thinking it’s time to hang up their loupe. “As a full package, they’ve done a very good job and I’d definitely recommend Wilkerson.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular