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Stuller to Temporarily Close Due to COVID-19

The governor of Louisiana issued a stay-at-home order.

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LAFAYETTE, LA – Stuller is temporally closing its global headquarters in Lafayette, LA, due to the recent developments regarding coronavirus within the state.

Starting Monday, March 23, at 5 p.m. CDT, the manufacturer is suspending all on-site operations in accordance with the Louisiana governor’s mandatory policy through Sunday, April 12. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards announced the stay-at-home order after the state topped 1,100 cases.

“It is difficult for us to be unable to fully serve our customers during this time,” said Danny Clark, president of the company. “Our long-term relationship with each customer is our most precious asset. We will stand tall at this moment and do the right thing for our country, our state, our industry, and our employees and with anticipation look forward to the day when we can serve the industry once again.”

At this time, Stuller “is committed to servicing all of their customers’ urgent needs through the phone and live chat,” according to a press release from the manufacturer. A limited staff of customer care associates is available from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central for general questions.

Check Stuller.com for the most up-to-date information or text ALERTS to 32078 to receive SMS updates for COVID-19 and other business-critical alerts for Stuller.

“Ultimately, we believe temporarily suspending operations in our Lafayette facility is the right thing to do for our coworkers, our communities, and our country,” said Matt Stuller, CEO and founder. “We are committed to resuming normal business operations as soon as the ‘stay at home’ order is lifted. We thank you for your understanding during this difficult time for all.”

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