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David Brown

These Jewelry Stores Reported Sluggish Sales for October

Plus: something to think about.

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OUR SAME STORE DATA for October 2018 again showed a drop in sales performance across the stores being measured. Monthly sales of $102,602 were down 4.85 percent compared with the same period last year. Average sale of $399 for the month was an increase of 8.7 percent on last year’s monthly average retail value of $367. Sales volume, however, continued the decline, dropping from 262 units to 218, a drop of 16.7 percent, which has dragged the overall performance down.

Our rolling 12-month figures show a decline of 0.33 percent in the result from last month, representing the ninth straight month that numbers have fallen across the data pool. Year-to-date sales figures have now declined from $1,629,755 in January to $1,574,687 at the end of October, a drop of $55,000 in sales. Given a profit at keystone this will have reduced the average store’s bottom line, assuming all other costs stayed consistent, by over $27,000 during this period.

As the numbers above show, keystone is becoming increasingly harder to achieve, with margins consistently being below 50 percent over the last three years of data. Within these figures is also another story. When you look at the result achieved for October 2018 of 48 percent margin, the breakdown shows the smaller stores under $1 million in sales achieving 50 percent margin and those up to $3 million in sales per year achieving 46 percent. The largest stores have a margin of just 41 percent for the month.

“Well, they must be selling more high-priced diamonds at a reduced margin,” I hear you say. Certainly the bigger stores are achieving a much better average sale in diamonds, which will be contributing a squeeze to margin where there are higher ticket items. However, the best-performing stores for diamond sales, as a percentage of overall store sales, are stores doing between $1 million and $3 million, with diamonds representing 55 percent of total sales. Next are stores with less than $1 million in sales, which are making 53 percent of their sales from diamond product. The biggest stores are only seeing 46 percent of their sales coming from diamonds.

Where the biggest difference lies is in the area of watches. Here’s a look at the numbers across all stores.

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As the chart shows, the bigger the store, the more significant the percentage of sales for watches, with the resulting impact on margins that watches can have compared to jewelry.

Although smaller stores can congratulate themselves on maintaining a better margin and doing well in diamond jewelry, this does raise the question, why are smaller stores not achieving a bigger percentage of sales in watches? Although we don’t carry ongoing data on the average sale from watches, a quick glance at October results does show an average sale for larger stores of $4,000 versus $1,200 for medium-sized stores and just $360 for smaller stores. The elite brands carried by the bigger stores are making a difference in this area.

20 percent of sales is a significant amount. Not every jeweler can carry a top-brand watch, or would want to, but it does show that the watch market is not all about discount stores and cheap knockoffs. Where do watches fit into your store strategy? Are you assuming they are a market you can’t get a larger slice of? Should you be reviewing your strategy in this area?

David Brown is president of the Edge Retail Academy, a force in jewelry industry business consulting, sell-through data and vendor solutions. David and his team are dedicated to providing business owners with information and strategies to improve sales and profits. Reach him at david@edgeretailacademy.com

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David Brown

How to Make The Most of Your Department Reports

Allocating the appropriate time, money and space to each department is critical to success.

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DEPENDING ON THE TYPE of business you run, chances are your sales will be coming from perhaps 30 or 40 different departments across your store. Some, such as bridal, are more obvious. Others, such as silver earrings, may not make a big difference — yet it’s important to understand the contribution from each department and where it fits into the overall performance of your store.

A department report in order of sales will reveal the biggest contributors, and it should come as no surprise to know that the top 5 or 6 departments might be contributing 50 percent or more of your storewide sales. What might surprise you is which departments make up the top 5 or 6. Take a guess now and then compare it to your actual results; chances are you’ll see at least one department that wasn’t in your estimate.

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Knowing this will enable you to allocate your resources towards these areas. These resources are, in no order of importance:

1. Time
2. Money
3. Space

Time refers to the energy you and your staff devote, both physically and mentally, to this area of your business. You might have a love of watches and enjoy spending time checking out the latest models available, but if watches represent 3 percent of your sales, this category doesn’t warrant a lot of effort.

Money will predominantly be spent on two fronts: one is your inventory, while the other is marketing. Is the inventory you carry in each department relevant to that department’s contribution to your sales and profitability? If not, consider reallocating it. Are you running ads for an area of your business that is neither a significant contributor to sales or profit? Do you allocate your marketing spend by area based on what product you are advertising? It’s not unusual to find a business spending 90 percent of its marketing on diamonds when that category represents only 30 percent of sales.

Space refers to how you allocate the merchandise within your store. Are your best sellers front and center? If your store is 50 percent bridal, does your merchandising say this when your customers walk into your store?

Review your departmental contribution and determine how you are allocating your resources of time, money and space across each area. Make a decision to rebalance each area as required so it more closely aligns to your store’s performance. The exception to this is if you are hoping to grow a particular area, in which case your resources should align with your anticipated results and performance.

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David Brown

What Business Owners Can Learn from Abraham Lincoln’s Failures

He would never have been in position to succeed if he hadn’t failed first.

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WE ARE CONDITIONED BY society to fear failure. Our education system defines performance as “getting the answer correct.” This result-based measurement is an effective method for assessing a level of knowledge, but it doesn’t encourage the hands-on learning process so necessary to develop true understanding and retaining of information — nor encourage the discovery of new knowledge.

Sadly, this aversion to getting things wrong starts at an early age and continues our whole life. Despite the copious number of successful people who have failed spectacularly before achieving success, we still attempt to follow a path that has more to do with avoiding ignominy than with enjoying the benefits of stretching ourselves into uncharted territory.

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Abraham Lincoln never feared failure — he could little afford to. His list of unsuccessful endeavors in both business and politics would have forced a lesser man to give up. Here are just some of his “failures.”

1831: Failed in business.
1832: Ran for state legislature — lost.
1832: Also lost his job — wanted to go to law school but couldn’t get in.
1833: Borrowed some money from a friend to begin a business, and by the end of the year was bankrupt. He spent the next 17 years paying off this debt.
1838: Sought to become speaker of the state legislature — defeated.
1840: Sought to become elector — defeated.
1843: Ran for Congress — lost.
1846: Ran for Congress again — this time he won — went to Washington and did a good job.
1848: Ran for re-election to Congress — lost.
1849: Sought the job of land officer in his home state — rejected.
1854: Ran for Senate of the United States — lost.
1856: Sought the vice-presidential nomination at his party’s national convention — got less than 100 votes.
1858: Ran for U.S. Senate again — again he lost.
1860: Elected president of the United States.

What sort of president would Lincoln have become if he had not had his failures? Had his life been a succession of unbridled achievements, would he have had the fortitude or fighting qualities to drag the country through its toughest challenge ever? Or would he have been ill-prepared for the physical and mental battle the presidency required? I believe his history of failing provided him with the steel and determination he needed to see the job through. Had he not “failed” so many times, he would not have become the man he was — and the history of the United States may have looked sharply different.

Learning to fail helps you overcome the fear of testing your boundaries and ultimately helps you grow and succeed. When it happens, embrace it for the lessons it can teach.

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David Brown

9 Ways to Unload Dead Inventory

When old inventory clogs the cash-flow arteries of your store, here’s how to clean it out.

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LAST MONTH, WE talked about the process of controlling what you buy and what you consume with your inventory. Much like dieting — where your buying and consumption dictate how many pounds you put on — the process of clearing extra inventory is much like shedding that extra weight that works its way onto your hips and stomach. You have to hit the exercise gear when the weight goes up, and the same is true with your surplus inventory. If you don’t move it on, that inventory will sit around your business waistline, clogging up your cash-flow arteries and damaging the health of your business.

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Here are some of our best suggestions for shedding those surplus items that are no longer helping your business health:

1. Run a sale. The obvious answer is to have a major clearance, but care needs to be shown here. Some businesses live constantly in sale mode to the extent that it harms the ability to generate sales at any other time. Use this sparingly and be creative in how you promote it.

2. Have a clearance area. Less harmful than a full-on sale to your bottom line, this can allow you to drip out items that are not going anywhere at full price.

3. Talk to your vendors. In some circumstances, vendors will be happy to exchange items that are not moving for you. This, however, will depend on the item and their ability to sell it elsewhere. Don’t expect this as a right. This needs to be done in a way that is a win/win for both parties involved.

4. Talk to your fellow retailers. As the old saying goes, “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.” Product that may not sell in your store can be fast-selling items for other retailers.

5. Try online. Giving your product a different exposure via your web store may help it move.

6. Reposition the product. It may be good product that’s in a bad location. Have you rearranged your store displays so the product is in a more prominent place? It may be in a spot that customers don’t access easily.

7. Melt it down, make it back up and move it on.

8. Bundle it up. Often, those slow-moving items will benefit by being combined with other pieces. Maybe slow items could be put together as a special, or you could combine a slow item as a deal to go with a full-priced fast seller.

9. Use as a contest giveaway. Of course, if it’s particularly bad, it won’t encourage contest entries!

Managing dead inventory is a fact of business. You can never eliminate it completely, but regular “inventory exercise” is needed to make sure the fat in the system isn’t causing trouble to your business health.

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