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This Tech Could Pull Consumers Back to Bricks-and-Mortar Retail

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New developments are debuting this week.

Several new technologies could help bricks-and-mortar retailers win customers back from the online retail sites that have gained popularity in recent years, the Associated Press reports.

One example: smart shelves. They’ll work sort of like online ads that track consumers from site to site. Technology by startup Perch Interactive “uses laser and motion sensors to detect when a product is picked up,” according to AP.

Retailers can then see which items consumers picked up but chose not to buy. The technology also provides shoppers with recommendations, such as complementary products.

Another emerging technology: interactive mirrors. At certain Neiman Marcus stores, dressing rooms feature mirrors that allow shoppers to “make side-by-side comparisons without having to try [the outfits] all on,” AP reports.

Robots, advanced self-checkout systems and virtual and augmented reality are also likely to play major roles in the future of retail, according to the news service. Many of the new technologies are debuting this week at the CES technology show in Las Vegas.

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