Connect with us

Columns

10 Tips to Keep Your Jewelry Store Safe During the Holidays

It’s no time to cut corners on security.

mm

Published

on

THE HOLIDAYS are a crucial time for jewelers to make sales and rack up profits.

However, they are also a time of long hours, increased temporary or part-time help, and more customers and confusion in the store. During this busy season, jewelers need to stand fast with their regular security procedures and not try to cut corners on security, which could result in a sour note in the season of holiday cheer.

Here are a few reminders for jewelers to keep in mind. Good security is good business.

  1. Holiday inventories may be substantially greater than a jeweler’s normal inventory. Make sure your jewelers’ block insurance coverage is sufficient for any higher inventory.
  2. The holiday season may cause days of hectic selling (hopefully!). Even in busy times, keep all showcases locked except when actually taking out merchandise or returning merchandise to the showcase.
  3. During the holidays, jewelers may hire additional seasonal or part time employees. Even these seasonal employees should receive basic instruction on proper security practices through short staff briefings.
  4. Even with long and late holiday workdays at the store, don’t try to save time by leaving merchandise in the showcases overnight.
  5. There is currently a wave of distraction thefts in the U.S. by gypsy gangs. Beware of three or more “customers” entering the store together. Their purpose may be to distract you. These gangs often seek to get into your open safe or unlocked showcase.
  6. Even when there is the hope of a big sale, show only one item at a time to reduce losses from grab and run thefts.
  7. During a jeweler’s busiest season, a security guard can be a good investment.
  8. Make sure all employees know of a simple and innocent sounding code word or phrase that can be said aloud when a sales associate feels there is a suspicious situation. At that point, other sales associates can focus on and assist if trouble is brewing.
  9. When accepting in-store credit or credit card transactions, check supporting identification carefully. There are times when you need to consider the question of why a person from a distant state or country may be buying an expensive item in your store on credit.
  10. At closing time, make sure all customers have left before you start breaking down the showcases and putting away the goods for the night. Do not unlock the door to let in customers following closing or before opening.

John Kennedy is president of Jewelers’ Security Alliance, a non-profit trade association with 20,000 members that has been providing crime information and assistance to the jewelry industry and law enforcement since 1883. Reach him at jsa2@jewelerssecurity.org.

Commentary: The Business

How Failure Leads to Growth

If you don’t try, nothing will change, says growth expert Elle Hill.

mm

Published

on

WHY ISN’T SHE breathing?” my mom asked the doctor, her eyes darting back and forth between the syringe and me. An injection and a few moments later, my breathing returned to normal, but my childhood never did. Instead, I began my carefully curated asthma life.

Everything I was allowed to do was designed to avoid the risk of failing. I was swaddled tight and never allowed to push beyond what we knew I could safely do.

Podcast: How Can Jewelry Stores Stop Losing Their Best Employees?
JimmyCast

Podcast: How Can Jewelry Stores Stop Losing Their Best Employees?

Podcast: A One of a Kind Family Heirloom is ‘Vaporized’ … and a Jeweler Goes Above and Beyond to Replace It
Over the Counter

Podcast: A One of a Kind Family Heirloom is ‘Vaporized’ … and a Jeweler Goes Above and Beyond to Replace It

Podcast: Using Social Media to Win Customers and Lower Your Intimidation Factor
JimmyCast

Podcast: Using Social Media to Win Customers and Lower Your Intimidation Factor

After university, I sat in my first apartment in New York City and made a decision that changed everything: I would run the New York City Marathon.

I’d go out every night after work, in the yellow light of the street lamps, armed with my inhaler and my steroid pills. And I would run. I would run until I heard the first wheeze. And continue until my breath became too shallow and I couldn’t run anymore.

That first night, I ran for four minutes. I stopped. I took my inhaler. I walked back home.

I had an ache in the pit of my chest, not from the wheezing, but from the fear of failure: I might do this night after night, and still not be able to run. I had never done anything I wasn’t sure I could do before. But if I didn’t try, nothing would change.

So, I repeated this for three weeks until I could run for 10 minutes. And five more weeks until I doubled that. In November of 1999, five months later, I ran the New York City Marathon in four hours and 35 minutes.

What I learned is how important failure is. It’s not a byproduct of success — it is the road to success. If you never fail, you’re playing it too safe. If you only act when you know you will succeed, you will never learn something new or reach your potential.

In the years after my marathon finish, I have had a new philosophy: I choose what I do next based on what intimidates me most. It’s why I started my own jewelry store, discovered it was a bad business model, and overhauled it. Each painful failure was a hard-won lesson that made me better, smarter, faster. And ultimately, I brought my company public in a $10 million IPO in less than five years.

Taking a leap when you can’t guarantee success is exactly what you must do to learn, to grow.

To succeed, you must first aim to fail.

Continue Reading

Columns

Want to Sell More Silver? Here Are Five Ways to Do It

Female self-purchasers are key.

mm

Published

on

SILVER HAS BECOME AN increasingly important category for many jewelers over the past several years both in driving sales and providing margin. To determine specifics on market performance and help support further growth, the Silver Promotion Service fields an annual market measurement study, and year after year, the results point to silver’s strength as a key category for sales.

Video: How to Hire the Best People for Your Jewelry Store
Jimmy Degroot

Video: How to Hire the Best People for Your Jewelry Store

Video: Jim Ackerman on Why Your Digital Marketing Doesn’t Work Like the Experts Say It Should
Jim Ackerman

Video: Jim Ackerman on Why Your Digital Marketing Doesn’t Work Like the Experts Say It Should

Video: Don’t Miss the Biggest Opportunity to Improve Profits in Your Jewelry Store
Jimmy Degroot

Video: Don’t Miss the Biggest Opportunity to Improve Profits in Your Jewelry Store

Here are a few highlights:

1. Silver continually delivers the best inventory turnover, surpassing diamonds, bridal and gold. This presents an opportunity to keep your assortments fresh and try new collections. Plan a trunk show and advertise the fact you have new merchandise to offer.

2. The age group buying the most silver is 20-40 years old. Be sure that your marketing plan includes this target audience. Connect with them on social media. Share news about new collections, trunk shows and events. Most brands offer great images and marketing support — use it to your advantage!

3. Offer a silver collection that is unique to your area. Why offer the same silver collections that your competitors do — why not offer a unique collection that stands out from the crowd and thereby cultivate your own following? Why be “me too” when you can offer “exclusively at”? We showcase a range of silver collections at savorsilver.com; check them out and find one that works well for your store.

4. The female self-purchase customer presents a fantastic opportunity for sales, and silver offers the perfect entry price point. This customer can comfortably buy for herself and express her own personality and style. Like all silver customers, the female self-purchase customer shops often. She may drop in to celebrate a job well done or just to treat herself. Keep her informed about new collections and styles. Once you have created a great selection of styles to meet the needs of your target audience, you need to promote your news where they will see it and keep it fresh. You need to reach out weekly to this customer; a monthly flyer or newsletter won’t do the trick. Post, tweet and repost and find ways to make it automatic.

5. Silver delivers the best margin consistently over all other jewelry categories. The majority of retailers surveyed confirm this statistic. So why not build your assortment to offer a range of collections, from classic to dramatic? Contact your clients when a coordinating piece or new collection arrives from their favorite designer. Learning to make additional offers will make the difference in growing versus just maintaining your silver business.

Continue Reading

Shane Decker

For Successful Retailers, Failure is Not an Option, Says Shane Decker

Sales trainer says too many owners give up too quickly.

mm

Published

on

A WORD THAT IS NOT in my vocabulary and should not be in yours is “failure.” Failure can almost always be avoided and is almost always human-designed.

Failure generally happens because of lack of planning. Owners and managers say, “I’ll try it!” and they try it one time, then they say it didn’t work. That’s because most don’t want to put in the effort to truly change. They stay with their old bad habits instead of formulating new habits.

If you don’t like change, you’re going to hate extinction.

So don’t try it — do it. And keep doing it right until you get it done correctly and successfully. Here is a list of things that will set you up for failure if you don’t change your ways.

1. Not closing. Outside of bridal clients, 80 percent of people buy the day they shop. People don’t have time to shop tomorrow if they’re shopping today. 60-70 percent of shoppers who say they’ll be back buy within two hours of leaving your location.
2. Not handling objections or knowing how to team sell, add on, wow, sell company benefits or use value-added statements. Many salespeople don’t know the anatomy of a clerk sale or a created one. They also don’t understand how to convert repair clients into sales.
3. GIA is the Harvard of our industry, but most salespeople don’t take Diamonds 1 and 2. A lot of young customers know more than the salespeople do.
4. Lack of store floor awareness.
5. Negotiating to close the sale and thereby losing profits. Salespeople use negotiating price as a cop-out because they either don’t know any better or are too lazy to do better.
6. Keeping your inventory too long. After two years, it’s dead money.
7. Bad marketing.
8. Not setting sales and business goals.
9. Not marking merchandise up enough, especially diamonds.
10. Not having enough events to increase traffic.
11. Not tracking your sales closing ratio to measure how your team is doing.
12. Not having enough high-end inventory and large diamonds. More and more clients are buying higher-dollar items, but you have to have it before they can.
13. Selling from a poverty-level mentality (selling out of your own pocket).
14. Bad location.
15. Crappy websites designed by Fred Flintstone.
16. Not remodeling old stores.
17. Being closed on Mondays. It’s becoming a big shopping day again.
18. Proper signage not visible. Clients walk into stores all the time and say, “I didn’t know there was a jewelry store here!”
19. Lack of services like appraisals, repairs, CAD/CAM. Work done poorly or not on time.
20. Overpromising and underdelivering.

It’s easy to fail, but it takes dedication, time and wisdom to succeed. If you improve in these areas and work toward success, promote professionalism and have the best-trained staff front and back, you will have a long life in this industry.

Continue Reading

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Subscribe


BULLETINS

INSTORE helps you become a better jeweler
with the biggest daily news headlines and useful tips.
(Mailed 5x per week.)

Latest Classifieds

Most Popular