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NFL Player’s Jewelry Fraud Lawsuit Award Grows to $8.9M

It started at $6.1M.

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A jewelry-related judgment awarded to Drew Brees, quarterback for the NFL’s New Orleans Saints, has grown substantially.

NFL Player’s Jewelry Fraud Lawsuit Award Grows to $8.9M

Drew Brees

In June it was reported that Brees had won $6.1 million in damages following claims that a jeweler sold him diamonds at grossly inflated prices. Now the amount has reached $8.9 million as a result of interest and prejudgment costs, NBC Sports reports.

But the jeweler, Vahid Moradi, has appealed the judgment, according to the news outlet.

In a jury trial in San Diego, Brees said he bought $15 million in diamonds from Moradi and CJ Charles Jewelers over a four-year period ending in 2016. He said he’d become friends with Moradi and trusted him completely.

Brees said he and his wife, Brittany, were then told by an appraiser that they’ve overpaid by about $7 million.

The Breeses alleged fraud and breach of contract, as well as violation of California business law.

Moradi said he sold jewelry to the Breeses at a normal retail markup.

Read more at NBC Sports

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