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Smooth Seller: Lynn Westcott

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Shortly after Lynn Westcott graduated from college, she answered a want ad for a management position with a jewelry store.

Smooth Seller:  Lynn Westcott

[componentheading]INTERVIEW[/componentheading]

[dropcap cap=S]hortly after Lynn Westcott graduated from college, she answered a want ad for a management position with a jewelry store. “It sounded interesting, and I figured I’d work in jewelry until I found a real job!” That was 28 years ago. Today, as sales consultant with Northeastern Fine Jewelry, where she’s been for 16 years, Westcott averages over $1 million annually in personal sales. “My best year was $1.3 million,” Westcott says, adding that even through the difficult times of 2009, she still did $1.1 million.  — LORRAINE DEPASQUE [/dropcap]

PROFILES: Gathering customer information is key. Even if a woman just comes in for a repair, cleaning, or appraisal, but looks at a designer necklace, after she leaves, I put that down. Then, later on, if I know she has a celebration coming up or we’re having an event that might interest her, I contact her.

ENGAGEMENT RINGS: While a bride is looking at bands, I make notes on earrings or bracelets she might also be looking at, then I’ll contact her — or her fiancé — and ask if she might want the piece to wear on her wedding day.

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E-MAIL: E-mail has become probably 50 percent of how we contact customers. For one couple I worked with on a diamond engagement sale, I wound up doing almost the whole presentation through e-mail, sending photos back and forth.

NEW CUSTOMERS: First, I try to find a common bond, asking them if someone I might know sent them to us. I also walk them through the store to ensure that they don’t find the store intimidating.

DOWN-TO-EARTH: I’ve always used a low-pressure approach. I tell myself, “Have fun and don’t be too methodical.” I encourage people to try jewelry on.

CLOSE: I might ask, “Why don’t you let our jeweler see how soon they can have this set up for you?”

AN “OFF” DAY: I just remind myself that every day is a new opportunity. Two sales can turn everything around.

[span class=note]This story is from the June 2010 edition of INSTORE[/span]

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

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Smooth Sellers

Smooth Seller: Lynn Westcott

Published

on

Shortly after Lynn Westcott graduated from college, she answered a want ad for a management position with a jewelry store.

Smooth Seller:  Lynn Westcott

[componentheading]INTERVIEW[/componentheading]

[dropcap cap=S]hortly after Lynn Westcott graduated from college, she answered a want ad for a management position with a jewelry store. “It sounded interesting, and I figured I’d work in jewelry until I found a real job!” That was 28 years ago. Today, as sales consultant with Northeastern Fine Jewelry, where she’s been for 16 years, Westcott averages over $1 million annually in personal sales. “My best year was $1.3 million,” Westcott says, adding that even through the difficult times of 2009, she still did $1.1 million.  — LORRAINE DEPASQUE [/dropcap]

PROFILES: Gathering customer information is key. Even if a woman just comes in for a repair, cleaning, or appraisal, but looks at a designer necklace, after she leaves, I put that down. Then, later on, if I know she has a celebration coming up or we’re having an event that might interest her, I contact her.

Advertisement

ENGAGEMENT RINGS: While a bride is looking at bands, I make notes on earrings or bracelets she might also be looking at, then I’ll contact her — or her fiancé — and ask if she might want the piece to wear on her wedding day.

E-MAIL: E-mail has become probably 50 percent of how we contact customers. For one couple I worked with on a diamond engagement sale, I wound up doing almost the whole presentation through e-mail, sending photos back and forth.

NEW CUSTOMERS: First, I try to find a common bond, asking them if someone I might know sent them to us. I also walk them through the store to ensure that they don’t find the store intimidating.

DOWN-TO-EARTH: I’ve always used a low-pressure approach. I tell myself, “Have fun and don’t be too methodical.” I encourage people to try jewelry on.

CLOSE: I might ask, “Why don’t you let our jeweler see how soon they can have this set up for you?”

AN “OFF” DAY: I just remind myself that every day is a new opportunity. Two sales can turn everything around.

Advertisement

[span class=note]This story is from the June 2010 edition of INSTORE[/span]

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials | Zadok Master Jewelers

Stick to the Program — And Watch Your Sales Grow

When Zadok Master Jewelers in Houston, Texas, decided to move to a new location (they’d been in the same one for the 45 years they’d been in business), they called Wilkerson to run a moving sale. The results, says seventh-generation jeweler Jonathan Zadok, were “off the charts” in terms of traffic and sales. Why? They took Wilkerson’s advice and stuck to the company’s marketing program, which included sign twirlers — something Jonathan Zadok had never used before. He says a number of very wealthy customers came in because of them. “They said, ‘I loved your sign twirlers and here’s my credit card for $20,000.’ There’s no way we could have done that on our own,” says Zadok. “Without Wilkerson, the sale never, ever would have come close to what it did.”

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular