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This Company Turns Unused IVF Embryos Into Jewelry

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Firm is ‘pioneering the way in this sacred art,’ founder says.

A company in Australia is turning unused IVF embryos into jewelry.

Baby Bee Hummingbirds provides the service for patients who have undergone in vitro fertilization procedures, parenting website Kidspot reports.

“I don’t believe there is any other business in the world that creates jewellery from human embryos, and I firmly believe that we are pioneering the way in this sacred art, and opening the possibilities to families around the world,” Amy McGlade, founder of Baby Bee Hummingbirds, told the website.

The cost ranges from $80 (about $60 in U.S. currency) to $600 (US $445). The company has made about 50 pieces of embryo jewelry.

According to Kidspot, families send the company “embryo straws” which it “expertly preserves and cremates, creating a type of ’embryo ash.'”

McGlade stated: “We are experts in preserving DNA so that it can be set in a jeweller’s grade resin.” The site published several photos of the jewelry.

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Baby Bee Hummingbirds makes other keepsake jewelry from items such as breast milk and umbilical cord stumps.

According to the article, some families choose to make jewelry of the unused embryos as opposed to other options such as donating them or paying to store them.

Read more at Kidspot

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