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Umbilical Cord Jewelry Is Now a Thing

The pieces sell for under $200.

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Umbilical Cord Jewelry Is Now a Thing

Some new mothers are keeping their umbilical stumps to use as jewelry, the New York Post reports.

The stump is the section that is left on the baby after the cord is severed. It falls off within three weeks.

Florida-based jewelry designer Ruth Avra uses a process known as lost wax casting to incorporate the umbilical stumps into silver necklaces. She cord is sealed in resin.

She sells the pieces, which she has been making since 2012, for prices starting at $175.

On her website, Avra explains that she can also make rings from the umbilical stump, and she can work in gold or platinum if the customer wishes.

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Avra is quoted saying, “It represents the connection between mother and child because it’s literally the physical connection that is between you.”

Read more at the New York Post

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