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Why a RAVE Attitude Can Change Your Store Culture

It starts with self-analysis by the owner or manager.

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SIXTY PERCENT OF working Americans today say they’ve left a job or considered leaving a job because they didn’t like their direct supervisor (according to a survey from human resource consulting firm Randstad US). So, while business is good right now, from what I’ve seen, the biggest problem for jewelers and all relational selling businesses is PEOPLE. We either don’t have enough of them, or we can’t keep the ones we’ve got.

It would behoove you as owners and managers to take a good hard look at your business model — and more importantly, your management style — and ask yourself, “Am I the problem?” Or “Could I do better at managing my team?”

In his book Creating Magic, Lee Cockerell, vice-president and manager of many Disney properties, uses the acronym RAVE: Respect, Appreciate and Value Everyone. One example he used was early in his life, he was a grease boy at a large hotel that had a burger joint inside. He was treated like dirt, but HE knew in his heart that if he didn’t collect the grease, burgers could not be made. No burgers, no customers. No customers, no restaurant. What a great attitude about the importance of every job and every position in our companies.

How do you show your team that you respect, appreciate and value them? And I wonder, if we had the opportunity to find out the REAL reason some good people have left our stores, what would that be?

Make it your goal this year to have a RAVE attitude toward your team and do whatever you can: Attend a seminar, buy a book, listen to a book, anything you can do to grow as a leader. Determine that you are going to be a better leader and grow a beautiful store culture so that people will not want to leave and people will be knocking down your door to work for you.

Just do a little self-analysis right now and ask yourself: What do I need to change in my personality or management style to create a RAVE environment at my store? Go after it! You’ll be a better person for it and the ROI will pour over in so many ways.

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Jimmy DeGroot is a jewelry store manager who has been in the business for over 20 years. Now he spends his time training teams around the world at jewelrystoretraining.com and sharing marketing advice through his blog site at jewelrymarketingguy.com. Sign up for training videos here.

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When There’s No Succession Plan, Call Wilkerson

Bob Wesley, owner of Robert C. Wesley Jewelers in Scottsdale, Ariz., was a third-generation jeweler. When it was time to enjoy life on the other side of the counter, he weighed his options. His lease was nearing renewal time and with no succession plan, he decided it was time to call Wilkerson. There was plenty of inventory to sell and at first, says Wesley, he thought he might try to manage a sale himself. But he’s glad he didn’t. “There’s no way I could have done this as well as Wilkerson,” he says. Wilkerson took responsibility for the entire event, with every detail — from advertising to accounting — done, dusted and managed by the Wilkerson team. “It’s the complete package,” he says of the Wilkerson method of helping jewelers to easily go on to the next phase of their lives. “There’s no way any retailer can duplicate what they’ve done.”

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