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12 Contrarian Rules of Jewelry Retail

Buy jewelry you hate? Talk people out of repairs? Jewelers insist these crazy business practices work.

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While it’s often wise to follow best practices in business, there are times to throw caution to the wind and break new ground in search of greater profits, more productivity or even less stress on the job. For 27 Contrarian Rules of Business, click here. But for contrarian rules that may apply exclusively to jewelry retail, check out the examples below, submitted by your peers.

1. Don’t hire jewelry experience

Stop worrying about “jewelry experience” when hiring. After working as a manager in the industry for a decade, I have realized that not only is industry experience often not important, a lot of the time it is detrimental because you have to un-train someone. — Emily and Matthew Clark, Spath Jewelers, Bartow, FL

2. Be open about your political beliefs

We are unapologetic about using our business and our platform to stand up for our beliefs, specifically in support of human rights, diversity and inclusion. We believe this is an investment in our community and the future. Some people may feel like a business should stay out of politics; we don’t. We won’t compromise our beliefs and don’t put a price tag on standing up for what is right. There is not a metric for doing business this way. — Bob Goodman, Robert Goodman Jewelers, Zionsville, IN

3. Stop producing bags or boxes

We don’t print our bags or boxes. They’re distinctive as we keep them the same and we encourage people to recycle them for gift giving. It makes us all feel good. — Sandra Locken, Sarini Fine Jewellery, Vulcan, AB

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4. Be closed more often

Two and a half years ago, we were drowning in work, always behind the 8-ball and under pressure. After studying daily sales records, I proved that the studio could be closed on Tuesdays to give us a day to just work. The shop catches up. I have a day to do business paperwork and running errands. We are available by appointment only, which gives us a great day to do design work. I promised my partner that if my assessment was not correct, and sales fell, I would change the plan. People are funny. The harder something it is to get, the more they want it. Sales held steady. No one freaked out. The shop no longer operates under stress. We are open 10 to 6 Wednesday through Friday and 9:30 to 3 on Saturdays. — Jo Goralski, The Jewelry Mechanic, Oconomowoc, WI

5. Don’t collect full payment up front

For custom design orders we do NOT collect full payment up front. We feel it is an added benefit for the client to have a little breathing room to not have to come up with a large payment all at once. The clients tell us they really appreciate it. — Joseph Villarreal, Villarreal Fine Jewelers, Austin, TX

6. Don’t buy the hot sellers

If a salesman tells me something is “hot,” I don’t buy it. Following the crowd is very bad for this store. Our customers are different. — Donald Killelea, Killelea Jewelers, Midlothian, IL

7. Talk people out of repairs

We talk people out of repairs every day, from suggestions on how to make their rings work in their present form to postponing expensive repairs until they are absolutely needed. We have gained restyling business and referrals from these customers as we are seen, and known, for doing what is needed, when it is needed, not over-selling repairs, but servicing our clients in what we feel is the best method. — Jonathan McCoy, McCoy Jewelers, Dubuque, IA

8. Let your employees make the rules

My employees make the rules, I am transparent about the numbers, we have a beer fridge … there’s a lot of non-traditional practices we have! — Jennifer Farnes, Revolution Jewelry Works, Colorado Springs, CO

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9. Buy jewelry you hate

We have three of us often in the buying decisions, and we always buy something that all three of us “hate.” Inevitably, it’s one of the first items to sell. We happened on this by accident and have run with it for years now! — Nicole Shannon, Keir Fine Jewelry, Whistler, BC

10. Hold onto old jewelry

I have an 80 year-old business. Some of the “treasures” I have held on to for one reason or another are now on display and selling rather well. It seems people are regularly checking to see what’s new in the old and estate jewelry. — Karen Schmitt, Straith’s Jewelers, Centralia, IL

11. Get behind on custom orders

I think by default, I have created a business advantage by being behind. I am so far out on custom order deliveries that it must be giving the impression that my services are really in demand. It’s like Groucho Marx once declared, “The only club I want to join is the one that won’t let me in.” The further in the hole my custom orders become, the more clients seek me out, mostly all by referral. — Murphy McMahon, Murphy McMahon & Co., Kalispell, MT

12. Show up late to work

I come in late every damn day. It works because I make my staff pick up the slack and I can hit the ground running when I get here. Seriously though, my staff is awesome and they know they have to be on the ball first thing in the morning because I am not. Don’t feel like changing that up at all. — Erika Godfrey, Hawthorne Jewelry, Kearney, NE

Chris Burslem is Group Managing Editor at SmartWork Media.

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