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Bankrupt Jewelry Store Is Selling Off Everything — Including Its Iconic Chandelier

A move hurt the retailer’s business.

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Scheherazade Jewelers in Edina, MN, is shutting down, and everything must go — including its iconic chandelier.

The high-end store closed suddenly in March, then reopened in May for a 30- to 60-day going-out-of-business sale, the Star Tribune reports.

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According to the newspaper, the business in Edina’s Galleria filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy in March.

Owner Scott Rudd is no longer working in the store. It’s being staffed by “a couple of longtime employees and workers from Eaton Hudson liquidation company,” the Star Tribune reports.

In a recent Facebook post the store said it’s accepting silent bids for its chandelier, along with “a variety of other decor, artwork and furniture.”


Most merchandise in the store has been discounted 20% to 60%, plus another 10 % off the initial discount.  Proceeds will go to unpaid wages as well as other debt, according to the Star Tribune.

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The store’s financial troubles have been linked to a move from a high-visibility location in the Galleria to a less prominent one.

Read more at the Star Tribune

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