Connect with us

Columns

Rough Edges, Inclusions and Fractures Add Their Own Beauty to Gemstones, Writes This Designer

A gemstone fresh from the earth can be mesmerizing in itself.

mm

Published

on

BEING IN TUCSON during the gem shows in February is magical. Gem lovers, addicts and hoarders descend on the city with great expectations. We are all looking for our fix, and Tucson provides for us all with the perfect gem.

But what does that mean to you?

Video: How to Smooth Out the Chaos in Your Jewelry Store and Create Harmony Instead
Jimmy Degroot

Video: How to Smooth Out the Chaos in Your Jewelry Store and Create Harmony Instead

Video: Don’t Be Afraid to Run Multiple Jewelry Marketing Promotions at Once
Jim Ackerman

Video: Don’t Be Afraid to Run Multiple Jewelry Marketing Promotions at Once

Video: How to Spend Your Jewelry-Business Advertising Budget the Right Way
Jim Ackerman

Video: How to Spend Your Jewelry-Business Advertising Budget the Right Way

It’s not like I can’t appreciate a perfectly cut flawless gemstone; they have their place. However, often, something like a flawless piece of Sleeping Beauty turquoise looks plastic to me, kind of like a beauty queen — pretty, but not all that interesting. I like a rock with experience! Some wisdom, fractures and veins. A scar, heartbreak and history. A stone that took an unusual path and carved its own groove despite the setbacks.

For the longest time, I thought I was alone. When I began working with raw crystals, “freeform” cuts, or heavily fractured and included stones, I didn’t get the best reception. Most of the time, people would say, “Oh. Um. Interesting.”

And we all know what that means. I had a handful of clients that sought me out. We were a fringe tribe; I loved them for “getting” what I was doing.

One of my favorite scores in Tucson was a strand of pale blue/green beryl crystals, heavily included with tufts of iron oxide. They were beautiful, simple with interesting natural edges. Each crystal was perfect on its own. Then, I managed to hit a home run! When I moseyed on over to see my favorite Italian cutter, I found he’d discovered the same vein from the same mine in Brazil, only this stuff was beautifully cut. I incorporated them together in a couple of necklaces: one for a special client, and the other one for me!

Advertisement

Things are turning around. Last year, at one of the Tucson shows, an influential buyer took me aside and said, “We are looking for jewelry that looks like it’s been dug from the earth.” Music to my ears!

Speaking of music, the whole raw unrefined thing applies to more than gemstones. It’s instinctual for most of us. Primal. In an interview with the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. a couple of years before his death, Tom Petty said that after he saw the Rolling Stones, he was inspired to go for it. “They were grittier [than the Beatles]; it was rawer. They were playing blues in this really energetic kind of raw way, but it wasn’t complicated. There wasn’t a lot of beautiful harmony involved.”

Gemstones and jewelry trends are indicators for our lives. The fact is, some of us want to go dig. Down to the primal part of being human. We crave that delicious, raw, watermelon tourmaline crystal slice with the rough edges. Dug from the earth.

Editor’s note: To view the jewelry referenced by Ksionda above, visit instr.us/lydia

Lydia Ksionda is the creator and designer behind the Leda Jewel Company, formerly of New Orleans and now back in her mother country of Canada. Lydia remains easily distracted by shiny sparkly jewels, food seasoned with love, and fancy schmancy cocktails. Please visit her jewelry site: ledajewelco.com

Continue Reading
Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Wilkerson Testimonials

Downsizing? Wilkerson Is Here to Help

Orin Mazzoni, Jr., the owner of Orin Jewelers in Garden City and Northville, Michigan, decided it was time to downsize. With two locations and an eye on the future, Mazzoni asked Wilkerson to take the lead on closing the Garden City store. Mazzoni met Wilkerson’s Rick Hayes some years back, he says, and once he made up his mind to consolidate, he and Hayes “set up a timeline” for the sale. Despite the pandemic, Mazzoni says the everything went smoothly. “Many days, we had lines of people waiting to get in,” he says, adding that Wilkerson’s professionalism made it all worthwhile. “Whenever you do an event like this, you think, ‘I’ve been doing this my whole life. Do I really need to pay someone to do it for me?’ But then I realized, these guys are the pros and we need to move forward with them.”

Promoted Headlines

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Subscribe


BULLETINS

INSTORE helps you become a better jeweler
with the biggest daily news headlines and useful tips.
(Mailed 5x per week.)

Facebook

Latest Comments

Most Popular