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David Brown

This Exercise Will Tell You Exactly Which Day of The Year You’ll Start Taking Money Home

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What’s your favorite day of the year? There are a lot of options to enjoy across the annual calendar, but one in particular often goes unheralded: Tax Freedom Day.

Each year, the Tax Foundation calculates how many days the average American has to work in order to cover their tax liability. This year, Tax Freedom Day occurred on April 19th. So from that point forward, every dollar, on average, you earn as profit is for yourself, not Uncle Sam.

Or is it? Tax is just one of the obligations a business has to meet. If you are going to work out when you’ve worked off your tax bill, why not some of your other costs?

The Tax Foundation has worked out the Tax Freedom Day based on an approximate average tax rate of 29 percent. That gets you to around the 107th day of the year, or early- to mid-April. As a business owner, we would want to look at our costs relative to income, not relative to profit — after all, some expenses may be greater than the amount the business owner takes home, so it’s not the best way to apportion your costs.

Let’s say your net profit is normally 10 percent of your total income. This would mean that tax would represent 2.9 percent of your total sales or income, rather than 29 percent of your profit. So your tax would be covered by income after 2.9 percent of the year, which means approximately 11 days of average annual income. 

If you achieve a 50 percent gross profit, then it will take you half a year to earn enough average annual income to cover the cost of the goods you sell. Depending on what percentage of your costs are attributable to different aspects of your business, you can work out how long you need to work to meet some of your other business obligations.

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For example; if wages represent 16 percent of your total income, then you will need 58 days of average annual income (365 days x 16 percent) to meet your staffing costs. If rent is 10 percent, then you’d be looking at around 36 days to meet this obligation. Of course, this is an extremely simplistic guideline, but it’s an interesting scenario to see who gets your money each day!

Of course at 10 percent profitability, and assuming an average income that is consistent each day, you would have to work until around Nov. 24. You can do the real exercise yourself and determine just when your profitability arrives. Given the proportion of income that skews toward December, it’s more likely that your Profit Freedom Day will be sometime after the middle of December.

So focus on cutting your costs and raising your margin — the sooner you can start keeping that income for yourself, the better it will be! 

David Brown is president of the Edge Retail Academy, a force in jewelry industry business consulting, sell-through data and vendor solutions. David and his team are dedicated to providing business owners with information and strategies to improve sales and profits. Reach him at david@edgeretailacademy.com

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David Brown

Maybe You Don’t Need to Sell More Jewelry After All

How to balance the competing goals of raising sales volume and increasing your margin.

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AS DECEMBER APPROACHED, most jewelers were looking for some positive momentum in the lead-up.

Our November store data showed a slight increase in the right direction, with store comparative sales for the 12 months ending November 2019 showing an increase of 1.2% versus the same period a year prior. This might not be a figure that sets the world on fire, but given some of the recent stutters in results during 2019, it served as a promise of what might be to come.

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Sales of $1.921 million were up $22,000 from 2019’s $1.899 million, and over $90,000 up from the 2017 figure of $1.829 million. Sales units of 5,957 were down 7% on 2018’s 6,376 items sold for the rolling 12-month period, with average retail price per item increasing 8% to $322 from $298. Markup held its own at 85%, resulting in the average store seeing gross profit rise 1.4% from $872,000 to $884,000.

As we often discuss, growing your profitability can be something of a juggling act between maximizing your margins and increasing the volume of sales you make. Improving your bottom line can seem like an “and/or” argument – if I increase my price will my sales volume go down or stay the same? If I lower my price will the sales volume go up or will it make no difference? At the extremes the answer is usually yes – a 50% increase in price is almost certain to reduce the number of sales you make. Likewise cutting your prices by 50% should increase quantities sold. The question however is will it be enough to make a difference? In many of these scenarios the increase in the positive aspect may not be enough to counter what you have lost at the other end.

Let’s look at the scenario of choosing between an increase of 1% in prices versus a 1% increase in volume. It’s important to understand they don’t both have the same impact on profitability as we’ll demonstrate with the scenario below.

Jane runs a profitable jewelry store with the following numbers:

Fixed costs per annum: $250,000 (rent, salaries etc.)
Variable costs: $65 per unit (freight, commissions, goods purchased, etc.)
Sales: $1 million
Volume = 10,000 units

The scenario above would result in a profit of $100,000.

Raising Volume by 1%

Now let’s say she increases the volume by 1%. The fixed costs would remain constant, but her total variable costs would go up to $656,500 due to the extra expense of selling the additional items.

Sales would be $1.01 million, which is the same as raising the price by 1% and holding the volume steady. By raising the volume by 1%, Jane would increase her profits by $3,500 or a 3.5% increase in profit.

Raising Price by 1%

What would happen if she raised the price by 1% instead while maintaining the current sales volume?

Sales would still be $1.01 million, an increase of $10,000. At this level the variable costs would remain constant ($650,000) because we just raised the price per unit and didn’t have to buy or sell more items.

Fixed costs would also remain the same. This would result in an increase in profit of $10,000 – a 10% increase in profit, a figure that is $6,500 better than just increasing sales volume by 1%.

So, if you’re weighing up a strategy to build your business profitability, it’s important to know that not all methods work the same. Given this information, it may be better to concentrate on a plan that increases margins while maintaining sales volume rather than looking to build volumes at the expense of margin.

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David Brown

How the Power of Compounding Returns Can Make You Very Wealthy

Start early and continue to reinvest.

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ALBERT EINSTEIN CALLED it the 8th Wonder of the World — and it’s been a source of wealth building for many of the world’s richest people. And yet, the power of compounding interest is still one of the most misunderstood concepts in business and investment.

The power of compounding applies to business ownership just as surely as it does to investment decisions. Investors like Warren Buffett have built their fortune on businesses that offer a strong return on investment that can then be reinvested back into those businesses, or other businesses, that can continue to deliver similar returns. Compounding has allowed him to build an initial capital of less than $1 million back in the 1950s into a fortune of over $70 billion today.

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So how does it work? Well, I’m sure you’re aware of the leverage that can be achieved by reinvesting your returns to create still larger returns. What many people underestimate, however, is the power of how compounding can build up returns very quickly.

The graph above shows the impact of $1,000 invested in year one and earning a rate of 8 percent per annum — not an unrealistic return, and certainly less than most businesses would be expected to return given the risk. Over the first 30 years, the impact is gradual, as the investment slowly grows to a level of $10,062, or ten times the initial investment.

At this stage, a tipping point is reached. Over the next 30 years, it again grows ten times to reach $101,250 by year 60. And again, the next 30 years shows a growth of ten times, but now the investment grows in excess of $1 million by year 90 — all from an initial investment of $1,000. In just the next ten years, from year 90 to year 100, the investment doubles in size, adding the equivalent in that ten-year period to what was achieved in the first 90 years combined!

Now 100 years is more than the lifetime of most people, but the point is still well illustrated, and this example does not take into account the addition of extra capital. If the investor had added another $1,000 every year for 100 years, the total sum reached by year 100 would reach just over $29 million!

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This example shows the power of compounding, the benefit of continuing to invest more money each year which then compounds and, most importantly in my opinion, the power of starting early. This point is best illustrated by comparing someone who starts investing an annual amount from age 20 and stops at age 28 versus someone who doesn’t start until 28 and continues to invest that same amount annually until they are 55. If both people earned the same rate of annual return, who would have the most money at 55? Believe it or not, the person who invests from age 20 and stops at age 28 is still able to achieve a higher level of wealth than the person who starts later but invests for longer, even though the later person paid more money in. The power of compounding can make up for the first person no longer investing from age 28 onwards.

Both your business investment and personal investments need to consider the power of compounding when you make your decisions. You work hard for your money — there’s no reason your money can’t be working hard for you.

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David Brown

Here’s How to Succeed at Succession Planning

Be sure to consider these four areas to prevent unnecessary conflict.

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MONEY CAN BE A sensitive topic to talk about. Generally, people don’t like to discuss it even in the privacy of their own home. Yet, not talking about your financial situation can make a significant difference in how much of your wealth is passed on to other family members. Whether it’s a business being passed on or the wealth that it has created, careful planning is required.
Government legislation is constantly evolving in this area. It’s important to set up for the passing of wealth and to ensure this is compliant with the current laws.

Here are some things to consider:

1. Inform family members of what may be coming their way. Give them the opportunity to prepare for the financial impact an inheritance may have. More than one family has been undermined by a sudden arrival of wealth they didn’t expect and couldn’t handle. Such preparation can help them to plan their ownership and tax structures to handle it effectively.

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2. Be sure to involve key stakeholders. Be selective about who is involved in the decision-making process, the administration and the final beneficiaries. The process can be daunting and potentially alienate family members and cause unnecessary conflict.

3. Ensure a single unified vision. Particularly where parents are concerned, it’s important to ensure a consistent message is communicated about the ongoing management of the family business. If there is to be a successor, there needs to be an agreed upon approach as to who it will be and how it will be handled.

4. Don’t wait too long to pass on ownership and responsibility. If the business is to go to the next generation, a grooming process is recommended to ensure the transition is smooth and the successor has done their “time.” You should always be prepared for an unexpected event that may speed this process up faster than you intended — it’s better to be over-prepared in this area than under-prepared.

Whether a business is being passed on or the wealth that the business has created, it’s important that the vision is clearly communicated regarding how the legacy will be passed onto future generations. Sharing this vision can be an effective means of making sure the succession plan goes as smoothly as possible.

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