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David Geller

Here’s What’s Really Keeping Jewelers From Having More Money

If you think it’s low margins, you’re wrong.

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I WAS READING THE Big Survey in last month’s issue of INSTORE, and one question popped out at me: “What will be your greatest priority next year?”

Thirty one percent of respondents said, “Boosting profitability.” The money-savvy ones (21 percent) said, “Clearing old inventory.” Most jewelers just don’t get that there is a big difference between making money and having money.

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Someone once taught you that margin was your most important metric. Yep, that was a good thing when everyone made two and three times key, but no more. What hampers you from having money is not low margins as much as inventory level.

Your debt typically equals one-half to three-quarters of your inventory that’s more than a year old. It shows up as accounts payable, credit card debt, lines of credit, and money owed to you (the owner) for money you’ve personally loaned the company.

Having money depends on your ability to keep that debt to a minimum. How can you do that? As a jewelry store/shop owner, there are a few options.

  1. Repairs. This is a revenue stream that requires very few resources to produce income. Your ongoing costs are findings, small stones and your jeweler’s paycheck (plus the occasional equipment upgrade).
  2. Buying scrap. This really only requires several thousand dollars of cash on hand to make a profit. Buy it on Monday, mail it on Wednesday, get a check on Saturday and you’ve made a profit and replenished your cash to do it again.
  3. Inventory sales. This is likely your biggest cash outlay, and it needs to throw off revenue monthly. All of it must throw off revenue at least once a year. All of it. You can’t wait two and three years to have money come in to pay a bill or check tomorrow.

Look at 1 and 2 above. The amount of money required is small. You don’t keep scrap very long and most people order “just enough” in findings for jobs this month, maybe a few extra items.

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But inventory piles up for years and causes debt. In a jewelry store, your average inventory level should be somewhere between your cost of goods sold and gross profit amounts for a 12-month period. Any amount above that will show up as debt and poor cash flow.

Keeping inventory within these two numbers (give or take) will increase positive happy cash flow, increase your checking account balance, lower total overall debt, remove stale and outdated inventory, and may actually increase sales as you have more leverage to buy new fashionable jewelry that pleases your customers.

That would be a good thing, right?

David Geller is a 14th-generation bench jeweler who produces The Geller Blue Book To Jewelry Repair Pricing. David is the “go-to guy” for setting up QuickBooks for a jewelry store. Reach him at [email protected].

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