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Editor's Note

Want to Make More Money? Leave Your Product Comfort Zone

To have the right product for customers, you may have to leave your comfort zone.

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Last week, I was on the phone with our publisher, Matthijs Braakman, whose wife has recently opened an arts and crafts store in their hometown. We were discussing the various issues that confront retailers these days, and he said, “The bottom line is that if you don’t have product that people want, you’re not going to last long.”

It’s true: if you don’t have your product mix right, all the money and cool showrooms and genius social media strategies in the world won’t help you.

With that in mind, we bring you an issue chock-full of new product for show season. In our annual trend report, we show you the latest trends alongside comments from our Brain Squad regarding each style. 

But what will you do with this information?

I hope you’ll consider taking on some new product this season; something that doesn’t qualify as a “staple.” Sure, reordering top sellers is a must, but how do you keep clients coming back for more? You give them something new to look at and enjoy.

It doesn’t have to be expensive. There are more innovative, affordable lines than ever before as fine and fashion have merged into price points under $500. These are the lines that could provide sales growth for 2018.

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You don’t have to go in blind. Read the experts’ advice and ask your fellow retailers what’s proven successful in other markets. Make an educated decision and ride it through the end of the year. Get your staff excited, market your new product and see what happens. 

Hope to see you all in Las Vegas!

Want to Make More Money? Leave Your Product Comfort Zone

Five Smart Tips You’ll Find Inside This Edition

  • 1. Conduct “stay interviews” to find out what makes your employees most happy and productive. (Ask Instore, page 97)
  • 2. Close your store for a week so that everyone can vacation at once. (Brainstorm, page 92)
  • 3. Hire an employee to call past clients with an incentive to update their information. (Best of the Best, page 87)
  • 4. Use questions, not talk, to control the sales process. (Shane Decker, page 98)
  • 5. If a client is intent on a bargain, offer a discount on an older item. (One-Minute Mentor, page 96)

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SPONSORED VIDEO

Moving Up — Not Out — with Wilkerson

Trish Parks has always wanted to be in the jewelry business and that passion has fueled her success. The original Corinth Jewelers opened in the Mississippi town of the same name in 2007. This year, Parks moved her business from its original strip mall location to a 10,000-square foot standalone store. To make room for fresh, new merchandise, she asked Wilkerson to organize a moving sale. “What I remember most about the sale is the outpouring excitement and appreciation from our customers,” says Parks. Would she recommend Wilkerson to other jewelers? “I would recommend Wilkerson because they came in, did what they were supposed to and made us all comfortable. And we met our goals.”

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