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Shane Decker

18 Non-Verbal Cues That Show When Your Client Is Ready To Buy

Listen with your eyes to know when the customer is in the 30-second window.

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TOO MANY SALESPEOPLE talk right past the close. Why? Because they talk too much and don’t listen.

They do “show and tell” presentations without closing all the way through and properly building self-confidence for the client to make a purchase. Jewelry salespeople need to learn to listen with their eyes, not just their ears. A lot of communication from your buyer is non-verbal. Read the client’s eyes and body language. Look for both positive and negative reactions. If you have two clients, it gets to be even more fun because you can watch the body language, eye contact and the reactions between the two.

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The more you ask the proper questions, the more they will talk themselves into the close with a little encouragement. If you’ve given them the self-confidence and reassurance all the way through your presentation, the close should not be difficult.

When the moment arrives, it’s called “the 30-second window”: The presentation is over and they are ready to be closed. Here are some clues to watch and listen for that let you know when you’re in the 30-second window.

  1. A slight smile from the client. She’s telling you she’s happy with her decision and she’s comfortable with the price.
  2. Nodding his head up and down (and you didn’t initiate it). He’s saying, “I’ve made up my mind and let’s get it done.”
  3. Possessive handling of the item. This shows ownership.
  4. Long silences. Most of the time, you think he’s wondering how he’ll pay for it — but you’re wrong. He’s thinking, “How am I going to give it to her” or “I wonder if she’ll like it.” It might mean he needs some reassurance, but he’s definitely in the window. Never make it about the money; make it about the giving.
  5. Facial excitement or enthusiastic body movement. She is saying, “I want it now!” I’ve seen a woman get up on the guy’s lap and start making out. Now that’s a clue.
  6. Objections. These can be related to price, doubts about your integrity, or their own indecisiveness. If they’re price-related or indecisiveness-related, they’re throwing them out because they want a little more reassurance from you as a professional before they make a decision. You usually get price at the end of the presentation and indecisiveness somewhere in the middle. Remember: Objections show interest. After you handle the objection, always close it — that way, it’s not an objection again.
  7. Repeated questions. In other words, he asked a question in the beginning, and now he’s asking it one more time. He wants a little more reassurance before he gives you his American Express card.
  8. “Is this your cash price?” It’s a test; he definitely wants it, but he wants to see if you think it’s worth it. Tell him the cash price is the same as a check or credit card. Ask him, “Is that how you’re paying, with cash?”
  9. They take their credit card out of their wallet. This means you’re talking too much. They’re saying, “Shut up and take my money!”
  10. Couple looks at each other, then the item without saying a word. They do this over and over. She’s working him. Sometimes you closed the wrong person. Sometimes you have to close the buyer, sometimes you have to close the wanter. You can tell she wants it, so you look at her and ask, “Do you love this?” Yes. “Would you like to wear this the rest of your life?” Yes. Then you look at him and say, “Well?” That sale is over.
  11. Client leans in. That means he wants you to make it more private and he is ready to pay you. He’s comfortable with the price.
  12. She puts her hand on her boyfriend or husband’s thigh and squeezes. She is saying, “now.” Use her to help you close him, just like in the example above.
  13. Right hand positive, left hand negative. If he puts his left hand around her waist, it means they’re done and he’s leaving. If he takes his right hand and touches her shoulder, it means he loves the item.
  14. The client moves to a more comfortable sitting or standing position. Comfort shows they’re ready. Bowing up or getting stiff means objections are coming. If he gets comfortable, it’s time to close.
  15. You’re at the end of your presentation and there are no objections. That means they’re finished. Time to close.
  16. Head-scratchers, cheek-strokers and chin-grabbers. Those are all thinking postures. Always ask, “Is there something you’re thinking about that I’ve not answered yet?” If they say no, it’s time to close. If they have a question, answer it.
  17. Tapping the glass, which means he’s ready to buy.
  18. The woman just tried on an item and her husband or boyfriend is sitting next to her. He points at one; he’s telling her (and you) that’s the one.

Keep your eyes peeled for these non-verbal communications. That way, you’ll know when you’re in the 30-second window. Be ready to close it!

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Shane Decker has provided sales training to more than 3,000 jewelry stores. Shane cut his teeth in jewelry sales in Garden City, KS, and sold over 100 1-carat diamonds four years in a row. Contact him at [email protected].

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